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This is how Kentucky will look on August 21, 2017. I will be working on a map soon showing a close-up of the total eclipse path.

For those who have iPods and Androids, I have a new website setup to accommodate that type of technology which you can access by clicking here. You can also click here strictly for the flash animation of Kentucky.
I will be creating eclipse animations for the rest of the states as time permits.

 

Total Eclipse of the Sun
August 21 (Monday), 2017
animations below

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Xavier Jubier shows very, very nicely the distinction between greatest duration (which I checkmarked) and greatest eclipse (which you can see as a black dot on the lower right). Greatest duration (GD) is the point on Earth where the Moon will darken the Sun the longest, and for August 21st 2017, that point is in southern Illinois near Carbondale or Marion which are both within 30 minutes of GD.

Greatest eclipse
is meaningless unless you are an astronomer. It has nothing to do with the greatest duration per se. If you are concerned about the shadow of the moon pointing closest to the center of the Earth (which is the main part of the definition for greatest eclipse), then Kentucky is the place to be. You won't see it, but please feel free to travel to Hopkinsville for this invisible event!

Click on Jubier's map below to explore his interactive map.

Please visit Michael Zeiler's website eclipse-maps.org here. His maps are very detailed for showing time and duration for any city across the United States! Both gentlemen are showing southern Illinois, near Carbondale, as the place to travel for greatest duration of darkness at
2 minutes and 41.6 seconds!


A musical variation of the 2017 eclipse I posted on YouTube

I used Voyager 4.5.7, Adobe Photoshop and Flash, and Alcyone Eclipse Calculator to put this animation together. The music is from the album Around the World in 80 Days by Victor Young back in 1956 ( which still sounds great)!

This video conveys, more than any others that I have seen, the excitement and wonder in viewing a total eclipse of the Sun. I don't speak Japanese, but you can tell from the lady reporter's excitement that she was glad that she was on this assignment (and on a cruise ship)! The constant beeping in the background is a shortwave radio picking up a time signal and broadcasting each second as a beep. Even on a cruise ship, people want accurate information about how long the eclipse lasts, and what time it begins and ends. It is also handy if you are taking photographs or movies. This cruise ship seems to have thought of everything to make this an enjoyable experience!

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Updated on April 5, 2014